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Experiment #7

Viewer: Joey Jerome, Session 2

Tasker: John D. Berryman, M.D.

Data: Type 3 (viewer blind and solo)

Target Specific:

Essential Cue:
The White House / Washington, D.C. (August 1814)

Numbered Aspects:
1. The White House / Washington, D.C. (25 August 1814)
2. Major General Robert Ross / The White House / Washington, D.C. (25 August 1814, 4 p.m. Washington D.C. local time)
3. The White House / Washington, D.C. (26 August 1814, 8 a.m. Washington, D.C. local time) - perspective: as seen from 100 feet directly above

Note: Major General Robert Ross was the British officer who decided to burn the White House. On these dates, the presidential palace (later known as the White House) was burned down by the British invasion force led by Major General Robert Ross.

Comments: This session is the second session conducted for this target, and - as with the first session by another viewer - this session is quite good. The decoding errors present here are relatively minor. The primary focus of Phase 1 in this session appears to be the march of the British troops during the battle. There is even an interesting deduction of "British" on page 1. The remainder of Phase 1 continues this theme, and it is worthwhile to note several interesting deductions of fireworks, marching band, guards, and drums on page 4. In Phase 2 (page 6), the perceptions of sounds (voices, booming, yelling), temperatures, tastes, and smells are quite good. Phase 3 continues the military marching theme of the perceptions. Phase 4 lacks a desired quantity of low-level descriptive data, but the basic perceptions are accurate. Also, the perception of many concepts are quite good. Note that the viewer begins to suspect that the target may involve a march on Washington, D.C. as can be seen from the deductions on page 10. The viewer correctly perceives that the primary group of subjects involved in the target are members of the same group, and he even deducts a military unit on page 12. When shifting his attention to the second numbered aspect, the viewer initially continues with his perceptions of the group of subjects that are described earlier, and it is clear that the viewer is having difficulty determining if the event has a happy or sad emotional flavor, which is probably a consequence of the mixture of emotions at the target site, depending on which emotions from which group (the British or the Americans) are dominant in the viewer's mind at any particular moment during the session. But the viewer eventually does focus on a central person who is organizing "mayhem" (see page 17). The viewer's shift to the third numbered aspect yields a good supply of interesting perceptions. Beginning on page 19, note that the viewer correctly perceives that the primary target activity is over and that the target subjects (in this case, the British troops) are "basking in the glow of this accomplishment" (page 19). On page 20, the viewer also perceives the general disarray that exists after the event, and even notes the detail that there are "many small bits and pieces of stuff all over after (the) event."

Session Pages

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